Stranded architecture

 

Fohr-island

The German island of Föhr

On a small island in the North Sea two architects from different countries reimagine and redesign the hayloft of an old farmhouse to create a modern masterpiece.   It might sound like a legend, but this is the true story of a contemporary project by Italian Francesco Di Gregorio and Swede Karin Matz.

 

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

 

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

 

Fohr-Di-Gregorio-Matz-redesign

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

 

The little Friesian Island of Föhr, now part of Germany, has a seafaring tradition that dates back to the 17th century.  Di Gregorio and Matz drew from local elements of this history, such as blue-green ceramic tiles born from the island’s trading legacy with Asia, to turn a once dark and suffocating space into an airy and light-filled design. By tearing down almost all of the dividing walls and replacing them with one central wall, they created a unified space made cohesive through blue and green accents including tiles, paint, and a threaded staircase frame.

 

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

Föhr’s threaded staircase | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

 

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

A single central wall unifies the space | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

 

Apparently, the nautical inspiration that drove the project had an even greater influence than the architects originally realized, “Often you only realize after what it is that you have done; we returned in the summer and we realize what we had build. A stranded ship.”

 

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

Föhr | Francesco Di Gregorio and Karen Matz

 

 

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