With her  world of colored spray paints, acrylics, ink, and paper, young artist Alice Pasquini takes her art with her while she travels the world. Her drawings can be seen on dozens of walls in Italy, Spain, Germany and the rest of Europe. Not content to merely follow news of this amazing artist, we decided to ask her some questions in order to understand how she has developed her path of art and imagination!

 

in Berlin

in Berlin

 

You are a visual artist who works in multiple media and contexts from illustration to urban art to set design.  How did your passion for visual art develop so many creative outlets?  Which is the most recent of the areas you work in?

Going from one type of media to another is something that comes naturally to me.  I studied painting and animation, I worked as a set designer and illustrator, and I did street art for personal passion.  I try to bring together all of these experiences in my research as an artist and they help characterize my choice of subject matter and the style with which I express myself on different surfaces.   

 

in Brest (FR)

in Brest (FR)

 

There’s a lot of discussion over the difference between street art, graffiti, public art and murals. How do you define your street work and yourself as an artist?

I don’t really like definitions, as they seem really limiting to me. I just define myself as an artist. And as an artist, I follow instincts to express myself. It doesn’t matter if it’s on paper or on a wall. Every different expression has its perfect frame.

 

Print

Print

 

 When you’re planning a project how do you select a location?

I’m interested in telling small stories, fragments. When I’m walking around I try to follow my instincts in the choice of what the best location is for my designs. If I have to plan an exhibition instead, I always start with a concept in order to arrive toward creating that world and making an exhibition space.   

 

Call box in Berlin

Call box in Berlin

 

You’ve lived and worked in Italy, the U.K., France and Spain, how, if at all, has your approach to art changed across the experiences of those four different countries?  

I’m always traveling and I have to say that every place I’ve painted has inspired me in a different way of “living” on the street. The climate, the colors, the reactions of people around you – they all change. But the things that are universal are the things that are most interesting for me to represent in my art. Human emotion, the intimate moments between people – these are all universal. In this respect we are the same from Rome to Sydney, from Russia to Japan.

 

in Barcelona

in Barcelona

 

While there are now many amazing and well-recognized women street artists, it’s still an area in which the majority of artists are men.  Has this been a challenge or issue for you at all?

As an artist, I think the things that matters the most are your style, hard work and tenacity. As a woman it’s important for me to represent a world where women are independent, curious, aggressive, and full of character. I would love for little girls to be able to identify themselves with role models that are different than what’s proposed in society, which are women who are only portrayed as “cute,” passive, and superficial (this is especially true in Italy). 

 

in Berlin

in Berlin

 

Is there a particular artist or work of art that has inspired you? Is there any artist or type of artwork you dislike so much you wouldn’t display it in your home no matter how much someone paid you?

Duchamp, Veronese, Andrea Pazienza. I would never hang something on my wall that expresses cynicism. 

 

in Berlin

in Berlin

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